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Healing Temple of Asclepius
Asclepius (Demi-God)
Name Asclepius
Other Names Asklepios (variant)
Debut Battlestar Galactica: Escape Velocity
Significance God of Medicine and Healing
Photo Earth drawing of the healing temple of Asclepius[1]

Asclepius (Asklepios) is one of the Lords of Kobol in the Battlestar Galactica universe. In the religion of the Ancient Greeks, he is the God of Medicine and Healing.

Lord of Kobol[]

Asclepius and the other lords lived in peace and harmony with humanity on Kobol until the exodus of the Twelve Tribes two-thousand years ago. He is the God of Healing.

Ancient Greek Religion[]

Asclepius is the ancient Greek god of medicine who was also credited with powers of prophecy. The god had several sanctuaries across Greece, the most famous of which was at Epidaurus which became an important centre of healing in both ancient Greek and Roman times. It was also the site of athletic, dramatic, and musical games held in Asclepius’ honour every four years.

Asclepius (or Asklepios) was a demi-god hero as he was the son of divine Apollo, and his mother was the mortal Koronis from Thessaly. In some accounts Koronis abandoned her child near Epidaurus in shame for his illegitimacy and left the baby to be looked after by a goat and a dog. However, in a different version of the story, Koronis was killed by Apollo for being unfaithful; whilst, in yet another version, the Messenian Arsinoe was the unfortunate mother of Asclepius.

The motherless Asclepius was then brought up by his father who gave him the gift of healing and the secrets of medicine using plants and herbs. Asclepius was also tutored by Cheiron, the wise centaur who lived on Mount Pelion.

Asclepius met a tragic end when he was killed by a thunderbolt thrown by Zeus. This was because the father of the gods saw Asclepius and his medical skills as a threat to the eternal division between humanity and the gods, especially following rumours that Asclepius’ healing powers were so formidable that he could even raise the dead.

In ancient Greek art, Asclepius was portrayed in sculpture, on pottery, in mosaics, and on coins. Almost always, the god has a full beard, wears a simple himation robe, and holds a staff (the bakteria) with a sacred snake coiled around it.[2]

See Also[]

References[]

  1. Photo: Thom, Robert. "Healing Temple of Asclepius". Source: "The Healing Temples of the God Asclepius" on Gnostic Warrior.com. Retrieved on June 12, 2019.
  2. Asclepius at the Ancient History Encyclopedia. Retrieved on June 5, 2019, edited.
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